Gotye – Bronte

6 06 2012

I’m on a Gotye kick today, so it would seem.

By the way, Gotye’s album Making Mirrors is exceptional. Even if you are sick of hearing “Somebody That I Used To Know” on every channel on the radio, the album is diverse and strong.  Despite its release date of last year, it is in the running for Racing to the Red Light’s Album of the Year 2012 (because we only discovered it this year, and hey, it’s our rules here!).

I believe I got it digitally from Amazon for only $10 – well-worth it for sure. It’s been in regular rotation for weeks now.

Anyway, the closing track from the album is a melancholy downtempo tune entitled Bronte.  Here are the lyrics:

—–

“Bronte” by Gotye

Now your bowl is empty
And your feet are cold
And your body cannot stop rocking
I know It hurts to let go

Since the day we found you
You have been our friend
And your voice still echoes in the hallways of this house
But now
It’s the end

We will be with you
When you’re leaving
We will be with you
When you go
We will be with you
And hold you till you’re quiet
It hurts to let you go

We will be with you

You will stay with us

—–

Intrigued by the somber lyrics, and being the inquisitive type that I am, I decided to try to find the artist’s take on the song.  I must admit, I teared up a little bit when I read the following description of the meaning of the song:

The song Bronte is about a friend’s family gathering as their old dog is put-down.

If you have ever had a pet who suffered and had to be euthanized, then you can’t help but feel something when you hear this song. It’s sweet and sad and somehow an appropriate sendoff for a friend.

I believe the folks who produced the animated video for Bronte are independent Australian animators, who go by their first names, Ari and Jason.

image

The video follows a different interpretation of the lyrics, and is just as beautiful (but not as sad) as the inspiration for the song.

Sometimes I like to hear, and think about, sad songs. Life is hard, and it’s not like there aren’t a million daily reminders of that fact. But I think there is value in experiencing sadness and loss, because it (hopefully) encourages us to appreciate the good stuff a little bit more – the time we do have left with family and friends, or the simple pleasures in life.

Here’s the video:

Advertisements

Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: